Top Tips from Sarah on Summer BBQ Pet Safety

Ah, the sizzle of sausages, the aroma of burgers on the grill… there’s nothing quite like a summer barbecue with friends and family. But while we humans may be drooling over the delicious delights cooking up, let’s not forget about our furry friends who are eager to join in on the fun. To ensure a paw-some barbecue experience for everyone, here are some top tips from our Vet, Sarah Aldridge at Daventry Vets, to keep your pets safe and happy around the grill.

And just in case you need it, here is the emergency number for our vets in Daventry – 01327 877767.

See our contact and emergency information

How to Grill & Chill this Summer

If you know your pets will be into everything, it may be wise to keep them indoors, but if your pets can handle your ‘BBQ rules’, here’s Sarah’s tips for how to Grill & Chill:

  1. Create a ‘Safe Zone’: First things first, Sarah recommends establishing a designated ‘pet zone’ away from the grill and cooking area. Set up a shady spot with water bowls and comfy bedding where pets can stay cool while you flip the burgers. Portable pet pens are handy for this.
  2. Keep an Eye on Pets: Naturally, the sight & smell of food cooking on the grill will tempt pets to investigate. To prevent them from getting too close to the grill or attempting to steal barbecue food, keep a close eye on them or put someone on ‘grill guard duty’ to steer roaming pets away to safety.
  3. Beware of Hot Surfaces: Grills can reach scorching temperatures that pose a burn risk to curious noses and paws, long after cooking has finished. Sarah suggests using a grill cover or barrier to prevent pets from accessing the grill area altogether to avoid accidental burns, and have a plan for hot ash afterwards – see our emergency information.
  4. Pet-safe Barbecue Foods: While it’s tempting to share your barbecue feast with your furry pals, not all barbecue foods are safe for pets. Avoid giving them toxic or harmful foods like onions, garlic, grapes, chocolate, chicken bones, corn on the cob, and foods high in salt, spices, fatty juices, or sugar. Stick to pet-safe treats like plain grilled chicken or lean meat without seasoning. Consider grilling apple, mango, or cucumber for a tasty BBQ treat, if your pet can eat them or why not give them some of their favourite dog or cat treats.
  5. Watch Out for Falling Food: Accidents happen, and tasty treats may accidentally fall onto the ground. Picking up dropped food instantly will prevent pets from eating it; some items may pose a choking hazard or cause gastrointestinal upset.
  6. Keep Your Pets Hydrated: Provide plenty of water during the barbecue festivities for pets to drink. If they seem unwell, call our vets in Daventry on 01327 877767.
  7. Have a Plan for Leftovers: Clearing up thoroughly straight after a BBQ is vital when you have pets. Disposing of barbecue leftovers and scraps promptly and securely will prevent dogs and cats from scavenging through the rubbish. Leftover bones, skewers, and other barbecue remnants can pose choking or get stuck in their intestines, a top culprit for getting stuck is corn on the cob.

With these grill-tastic tips in mind, you and your furry friends can enjoy a safe and enjoyable barbecue season together in Northamptonshire. Plus, you’ll be helping to keep wildlife safe too! So, fire up the grill, gather your friends and family, and let the summer celebrations begin!

And remember, call 01327 877767 in an emergency.

See our contact and emergency information

Six dog-friendly UK staycation hot spots – from Daventry Vets

If you haven’t booked your dog-friendly UK holiday for 2024 yet, Daventry Vets’ team have pulled together some fantastic destination ideas that your whole family can enjoy.

A UK staycation has many benefits including an abundance of pet-friendly accommodations, parks and days out, they’re cost-effective compared to travelling abroad and you’ll likely have easy access to veterinary care (just in case).

Although, to help you avoid an emergency vet visit when you’re on holiday, check out Daventry Vets’ quick guide:

How to avoid vet visits on holiday

Best UK dog-friendly holiday spots for 2024

As voted for by Daventry Vets’ vets & nurses:

1. Dog Friendly Holidays in Cornwall

Cornwall is a fantastic place to take your dog on holiday. There are lots of dog friendly beaches check out this guide dog friendly beaches in Cornwall. The South West Coast Path runs all the way round the Cornish coast so you’ll never be far away from some amazing walks check some out here https://www.southwestcoastpath.org.uk/

There are lots of dog friendly shops and cafes some have doggie menus for your four legged friend.

2. Dog Friendly Holidays in Anglesey

Anglesey is a real treat. Situated on the tip of North Wales, you and your dog will have over 125 miles of coastal paths to explore. Set your dog’s senses alight with walks through fishing villages, woodlands, over cliff tops, and head down to the many dog-friendly beaches. Here are even more things to do in Anglesey with your dog: Dog Friendly Anglesey

Have you been to Cornwall or Anglesey with your dog? Share your experiences with other Northamptonshire dog owners on our Facebook page.

3. Dog Friendly Holidays in the Peak District

The Peak District has so much to offer, including over 100 dog-friendly pubs to enjoy a hearty meal and a refreshing drink in after your adventures. Visit the Peak District National Park with your dog for an excellent choice of walks such as the Monsal Trail between Chee Dale and Bakewell, and the challenging Kinder Scout, with Mermaid’s Pool and Pym’s Chair along the way. Check out these Dog-Friendly Pubs in the Peak District.

4. Dog Friendly Holidays in the Brecon Beacons

The Brecon Beacons National Park might not seem like your typical summer holiday destination, but this really is a hidden gem with plenty of dog-friendly walks and attractions. Plus, it’s the perfect base to explore the Welsh countryside and places like Rhossili Bay (which dogs are allowed on all year round) on the south coast. There’s plenty of dog-friendly accommodation in the Brecon Beacons too. For something extra special, our Daventry team suggests looking at Sugar & Loaf Cottages

Have you been to the Peak District or Welsh Brecon Beacons with your dog? Share your experiences with other Northamptonshire dog owners on our Facebook page.

5. Dog Friendly Holidays in Northumberland

The UK’s northeast coast has it all – long stretches of golden beaches, stunning scenery, and a seemingly endless choice of unique walking trails for you all to enjoy. Northumberland’s dog-friendly beaches all year round include Alnmouth Beach, Beadnell Bay, Embleton Bay, Seahouses and Spittal Beach.

6. Dog Friendly Holidays in Galloway & Dumfries

Southern Scotland is a beautiful destination for your 2024 dog-friendly holiday. Choose from acres of forest, sandy beaches, river walks and plenty of castles to explore. Dumfries & Galloway is an ideal place to stay as it gives easy access to the surrounding areas. Read this guide on top things to do in Dog Friendly Dumfries & Galloway

Been to Northumberland or Galloway & Dumfries, or have a favourite dog-friendly destination you think Northamptonshire dog owners would love? Share your holiday hot spots on our Facebook page.

Before you go, remember to download Daventry Vets’ quick guide:

How to avoid vet visits on holiday

Vet Sarah Aldridge answers FAQs on ticks and the health threat to dogs and humans

It’s that time of year again, when spring sunshine and warmer temperatures mean ticks become more of a problem. Whether you’re out and about in Northamptonshire or taking your dog on trips further afield, now is the time to be vigilant. Take a look at our article below in which Vet Sarah Aldridge, answers some commonly asked questions about ticks and the danger they pose to dogs and humans.

Guide to removing a tick safely

Daventry Veterinary Clinic’s Tick FAQs

What are ticks?

Ticks are tiny arachnids that feed on the blood of mammals, including our beloved canine companions. While they may be small in size, ticks can pose significant health risks to dogs and their owners.

Why are ticks on dogs such a problem?

Daventry Veterinary Clinic’s Veterinary Surgeon Sarah Aldridge, explains that ticks are more than just a nuisance – they can vectors for a variety of diseases that can affect both dogs and humans. When a tick attaches to a dog and feeds on their blood, it can transmit pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa and parasites. Generally the longer the tick is attached to a dog the higher the risk of transmission of diseases the tick may be carrying. Some of the most common diseases ticks carry in the UK are Lyme diseased more recently Babesiosis and Anaplasma. Dogs travelling abroad may also be at risk of contracting Ehrlichiosis from ticks, a bacterial infection that may cause bleeding problems.

Sarah shares that ticks are also highly adaptable creatures, capable of thriving in a wide range of environments, from wooded areas to urban parks. This makes it challenging to avoid exposure to ticks, especially for dogs who enjoy spending time outdoors. Ticks attach to other mammals during their life cycle and are especially prevalent in areas with deer. Additionally, ticks can be difficult to detect, as although they can attach anywhere on the body they often attach themselves to thin skinned areas of the dog’s body that are hard to see, such as between the toes, inside the ears, in the groin or under the tail. They can also be more difficult to spot in dogs with long or dense coats.

What are the health implications of tick infestations?

Sarah wants Northamptonshire dog owners to be aware that tick infestations can have serious health implications for dogs. In addition to transmitting diseases, ticks can cause local irritation and inflammation at the site of attachment. Some dogs may develop allergic reactions to tick saliva, leading to symptoms such as itching, redness, and swelling.

If left untreated, tick-borne diseases can cause a range of symptoms in dogs, including fever, lethargy, lameness, joint pain, and organ damage. In severe cases, untreated tick-borne diseases can be fatal. Moreover, certain tick-borne pathogens, such as those that cause Lyme disease, can also affect humans, posing a risk to pet owners and their families.

Can you prevent dogs getting ticks?

Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to protect your dog from ticks and the diseases they carry:

  1. Use tick preventatives: Our vets can advise you about the best tick prevention products for your dog’s individual needs depending on their lifestyle. There are many safe and effective options available, including oral medications, topical treatments, tick collars. It’s important for a product to kill ticks quickly to decrease the chance of disease transmission. Other factors to consider are bathing can wash out some topical treatments and it is generally not advised that dogs with tick collars sleep on their owners beds or have lots of close contact with children.
  2. Perform regular tick checks: After spending time outdoors, it is wise to thoroughly check your dog for ticks, paying close attention to areas where ticks are likely to hide such as between the toes, inside the ears, in the groin or under the tail. If you find a tick, it’s essential to remove it promptly and safely to reduce the risk of disease transmission – download our guide on removing a tick safely here.
  3. Avoid tick-infested areas: When possible, avoid or limit access to areas of known high

    tick density or at times of the year when ticks are known to be most active.

Download our guide on removing a tick safely

If you find a tick on your dog, it’s crucial to remove it properly to minimise the risk of infection. Download our guide on removing a tick safely for step-by-step instructions and helpful tips. With our guide, you’ll have the knowledge and confidence to handle tick removal quickly and effectively, helping to protect your dog’s health and wellbeing. We’re here to help if you have any difficulties with this – call us on 01327 877767.

Get our guide to removing a tick safely

By taking proactive measures to prevent tick infestations and promptly remove any ticks that may attach to your dog, you can help keep your furry friend safe from the dangers of tick-borne diseases. If you have any concerns about ticks or tick prevention, don’t hesitate to get in touch with our helpful team at Daventry Vets.

Vets in Daventry share vital vaccination advice for dog owners

Ensuring the health and wellbeing of our canine companions is a top priority. In this article, our vets in Daventry are emphasising how vaccination plays a crucial role in preventing the spread of infectious diseases and safeguarding the health of dogs everywhere.

So, let’s delve straight into essential information about canine infectious diseases below and our vets’ guidelines on which dog vaccinations are recommended for your four legged friend.

Ready to take the first step in protecting your dog?

Book a Dog vaccination appointment today

Why vaccinate your dog

Daventry Vets’ team of experienced vets know that vaccination is a cornerstone of preventive veterinary care, offering numerous benefits for your dog’s health:

  • Disease Prevention: Vaccination helps protect your dog from potentially life-threatening infectious diseases.
  • Community Health: By vaccinating your dog, you contribute to the overall health of the canine community in Daventry and far beyond, helping to prevent the spread of diseases.
  • Cost-Effective: Preventing diseases through vaccination is typically more cost-effective than treating illnesses and their complications.
  • Peace of Mind: Knowing your dog is protected against common infectious diseases provides peace of mind for you as a pet owner.

Common canine infectious diseases and recommended vaccinations:

When our vets in Daventry meet a new puppy or adult dog, they want to help them thrive. This includes talking to their owner about the importance of preventative vaccinations that cover the following diseases:

  • Canine Distemper: A highly contagious viral disease affecting a dog’s respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Vaccination against distemper is a core vaccination for all dogs.
  • Canine Parvovirus: A severe and often fatal disease that primarily affects the gastrointestinal tract. Puppies are particularly susceptible, making vaccination essential.
  • Canine Adenovirus (Hepatitis): A viral infection that targets the liver, causing severe damage. Vaccination against adenovirus is part of the core vaccination protocol for dogs.
  • Leptospirosis: A bacterial infection that can affect the liver and kidneys that can be found in standing water i.e. puddles, lakes, canals. The vaccine is often recommended, especially for dogs with outdoor exposure or those in regions with a higher risk. Leptospirosis is also a zoonotic disease which means humans can get it too.
  • Canine Parainfluenza: This respiratory virus contributes to kennel cough and is often included in the core vaccines, especially for dogs in group settings.
  • Kennel Cough (Bordetella): Kennel cough is a contagious respiratory disease, particularly common in dogs who spend time in close quarters, such as boarding facilities, doggy day care, or at dog parks. Vaccination is recommended for at-risk dogs so you should discuss this with one of our vets – book an appointment.
  • Rabies: Luckily we do not have Rabies in the UK and do not need to routinely vaccinate our dogs. If you are going to travel abroad with your dog it is likely they will need a rabies vaccine, contact us to find out more.

Tailored vaccination plans:

The specific vaccinations your dog requires can depend on various factors, including:

  • Lifestyle: Dogs with active outdoor lifestyles or those frequently in contact with other dogs may require additional vaccinations.
  • Age: Puppies require a series of vaccinations to build immunity, and core vaccination booster shots are necessary throughout their lives.
  • Medical History: Some dogs may have individual health considerations that impact their vaccination needs. Our vets in Daventry will consider your dog’s health history when creating a vaccination plan.
  • Location: Geographic location can influence the prevalence of certain diseases. Discuss your dog’s environment in and around Northamptonshire with our vets to determine the appropriate vaccinations.

Book a Dog Vaccination appointment:

To ensure your dog is protected against common canine infectious diseases, we recommend booking a dog vaccination appointment with our veterinary practice in Daventry. Our experienced team are dedicated to providing personalised care tailored to your dog’s individual needs.

Don’t wait – take the proactive step in safeguarding your dog’s health now.

Book a Dog Vaccination appointment today

Titre Testing:

What is it?

Titre testing is when we take a blood sample and the laboratory measures your dogs antibody levels to check for immunity against diseases. It is very good for distemper, parvovirus and canine adenovirus.

Whilst we know how long immunity will last for in most dogs and vaccinate at these intervals, it may last longer in some.

When do we do it?

  • Whilst very rare sometimes just like humans dogs can reactions to vaccines, although this doesn’t mean they will always have reactions. Titre testing allows to see if we can wait longer before repeating some of the vaccines.
  • Some medications or diseases can result in delays for vaccines and we may want to know immunity levels.
  • Some owners would rather test and only vaccinate when immunity drops ( Puppies will always need a primary vaccination course before titre testing and we do not recommend it for leptospirosis as immunity for this is much shorter).

Want to know more contact us

Vet Sarah Aldridge explains causes of bad dog breath and when to be concerned

Northamptonshire dog owners are no strangers to the unique scents that come with pet ownership, but one smell that often raises concern is bad dog breath. While it’s not uncommon for dogs to have occasional odorous breath, persistent bad breath, or halitosis, can indicate underlying health issues that require attention.

Our Vet Sarah Aldridge has put together the following article about the causes of bad dog breath, when it’s normal, and when it’s a sign of something more serious. Don’t forget that the nurses at Daventry Veterinary Clinic can demonstrate tooth brushing – call us on 01327 877767 to get booked in for a doggy dental demonstration!

Book a nurse appointment

Normal causes of bad dog breath

Occasional bad breath in dogs is not unusual and can be attributed to factors like eating smelly foods, chewing on certain toys, or simply waking up from a nap. If your dog’s breath is only temporarily bad and improves after a short time, it’s likely nothing to worry about:

  • Diet: According to Sarah, the food your dog eats can have a significant impact on their breath. Some dog foods may contribute to stronger odours, whilst high-quality diets teamed with practising good dental hygiene can help minimise it.
  • Oral hygiene: Just like humans, dogs need proper dental care. Without it, plaque and tartar can build up, leading to bad breath. Regular brushing and dental check-ups at Daventry Vets are essential.
  • Chewing habits: Dogs often chew on various objects that can affect their breath. However, the action of chewing on dental toys and chews can help clean their teeth and stop bad breath.

Abnormal causes of bad dog breath

Persistent and extreme bad dog breath is not normal and is one of the signs of dental disease and some illnesses:

  • Dental disease: Persistent bad breath is often a sign of dental issues such as gum disease, periodontal disease, tooth decay, fractured teeth or infected gums. Sarah advises that these conditions can lead to chronic pain and health problems if left untreated.
  • Digestive problems: Sometimes, digestive issues can cause foul-smelling breath. Gastrointestinal problems or an upset stomach can result in odorous breath.
  • Oral infections: Infections in the mouth, throat, or respiratory system can lead to bad breath. These infections need prompt medical attention.
  • Underlying medical conditions: In some cases, bad breath can be a symptom of underlying medical conditions like diabetes, kidney disease, or liver problems.
  • Oral Tumours: Sometimes bad breath is the first thing an owner notices when their dog has a tumour in it’s mouth.

Taking action

As with all dog health concerns, prevention is better than cure, and early intervention is always the best route as this will give your pet the best chance of a fast recovery. Sarah recommends that dog owners in Northamptonshire should take note of the advice below:

  1. Regular dental care: Establish a routine of brushing your dog’s teeth, just like humans daily brushing is advised to keep plaque at bay. Providing dental chews or toys designed to promote good oral health. You can have peace of mind the manufacturers have done their homework and their products really do work by choosing ones accepted by the Veterinary Oral Health Council Their list includes diets too.
  2. Diet: Feed your dog a balanced diet with dental-friendly options. Talk to our team for dietary recommendations.
  3. Veterinary check-ups: Schedule regular check-ups with our team, including dental exams, to catch and address any potential issues early.
  4. Stay alert: Pay attention to changes in your dog’s breath. If it becomes consistently foul, contact us to book a dental check-up.
  5. Professional treatment: When necessary, our vets may recommend a professional dental to address any existing dental problems.

While some degree of bad dog breath is normal, persistent and foul-smelling breath should not be ignored. It’s often a sign of an underlying issue that requires attention. Regular dental care, a balanced diet, and vigilant observation of your dog’s health can help keep their breath fresh and their overall wellbeing in check.

Contact our vets at Daventry Veterinary Clinic on 01327 877767 to discuss your dog’s dental care and how you can help at home.

Book a nurse dental appointment

Vet Sarah shares advice on helping your dog deal with moving house

A house move is a big change for the whole family to process. The team at Daventry Vets understand that this is often a stressful and turbulent time, but Veterinary Surgeon Sarah Aldridge is urging dog owners to not forget how their pets could be coping with the upheaval.

To help dog owners in Northamptonshire with a house move, Sarah and our veterinary team at Daventry Vets have put together advice on how your canine companion can learn to accept a house move. This will make the process a lot smoother for owners and their dogs. Our experienced team of dog vets are available to advise on an individual basis too, just book an appointment ahead of the big day.

Contact us for more advice

Why not share this article with friends and family that might be moving house soon? Copy the URL or use the social sharing buttons in this article.

1. Keeping to your dog’s routine

Our Daventry team know that most dogs and their owner have a daily routine. This may fluctuate slightly, but on the whole, it is highly likely your dog is fed, walked, played with and cuddled at a similar time every day.

As you are moving house, it will help your dog to adjust if you stick closely to this routine. Your behaviour and feelings will also have an impact on your dog’s stress levels. Trying to remain calm will in turn help your dog to react and behave as normal.

If you have the option of introducing them to your new home beforehand, it could help them to settle in more quickly. If not, then try to take them on some new local walks to get them used to the neighbourhood.

If there is along journey for your dog and they are not used to travelling make sure they have familiar bedding and are secure in your car. Our vets can prescribe anti sickness medication for dogs that get travel sick book an appointment for this in plenty of time.

2. Your old home

Packing your home up into cardboard boxes can often be emotional and time consuming. Especially if there is a dog ‘trying to help’!

Vet Sarah Aldridge recommends packing gradually so your dog will get used to the changes in their living environment over time. Also, keep their bedding and toys out for as long as possible. These familiar belongings will help to provide them comfort if their old home is starting to look a little different in the run up to the move.

3. Moving day

Once you arrive at the new house, you need to ensure your dog is safe and secure as your belongings are unloaded. If possible, set up a safe space in your new house immediately for your dog. Use their normal bed, blankets, toys and bowls and work on positive associations. The scents of their items will help to make them feel at ease in an unfamiliar environment. You will need to be patient with your dog during this transition period. Work on establishing their routine in the new home and stick to it as closely as possible in the beginning.

4. After you have moved in

There will undoubtedly be a lot of administration to complete once you have officially moved into your new home. On this list, make sure you include updating your pet’s microchip details and also updating your account details here at Daventry Vets.

If you are moving out of the area make sure you register with a local veterinary practice and tell us where we can send your dog’s clinical notes to ensure they get continuity of care.

Sarah believes that if you follow the guidance set out in this article, you are providing your dog with the best chance to become happy and settled in their new home as quickly as possible. If your dog suffers from anxiety, or you are concerned that a house move could affect them more seriously, contact us so we can help you make a plan.

Contact us for more advice

Canine Christmas dangers advice from Vet Sarah Aldridge

As Christmas creeps closer, we start to see an increase in the number of dogs Daventry Vets sees for seasonally related illnesses and injuries. Vet Sarah Aldridge wants to make owners aware of the risks that come with seemingly harmless Christmas décor and food and encourage them to use our Pet Proofing PDF guide at home in the run-up to Christmas.

How To Pet Proof Your Home For Christmas

The sooner your dog receives veterinary treatment for any of the conditions below, the better chance they have for a smooth recovery. Contact Daventry Vets on 01327 877767 if you think your dog could need emergency veterinary treatment.

Toxic substances for dogs

  • Chocolate
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Alcohol
  • Nuts – especially macadamia nuts
  • Members of the allium family eg onions, garlic, chives, leeks.
  • Caffeine
  • Xylitol – an artificial sweetener E number E967

Many of the food and substances above can be found on a buffet table, or around the house at Christmas time so keep watch of your dog and make sure they do not eat anything toxic. Sarah advises that foods with a lot of salt, sugar, or spice can lead to digestive issues and more serious health problems too.

What happens if my dog eats something toxic?

If you know your dog has eaten something poisonous, then call us immediately. Even if you are suspicious, still treat it as a veterinary emergency.

It is essential you let the team at Daventry Vets know what your dog has eaten and roughly how much and when, as this will impact their treatment.

Christmas Decorations

  • Tinsel
  • Baubles and tree ornaments
  • Wrapped presents and gift wrapping
  • Electric lights and cables
  • Candles
  • Batteries
  • Real Christmas trees, pine needles can irritate feet and cause stomach upsets.

The decorations and items listed above can be toxic but also cause intestinal blockages, digestive issues or burns that will require immediate veterinary attention. Vet Sarah Aldridge advises that it’s best to keep these items out of your dog’s reach and to consider using cable covers or a tree skirt to block their access to the tree and lights!

Remember to download our Pet Proofing Your Home Guide to help you get your place set up for a safe and smooth Christmas for all – download now.

Stress, anxiety, and overindulgence

Around Christmas time, it is normal for dog owners in Northamptonshire to see more visitors. This could be a cause of stress for some dogs, and they may start to display behavioural issues. Ensure your dog has a safe space to retreat to away from the busy Christmas celebrations so they can relax when needed.

Also, as with humans, dogs tend to overindulge on special treats and edible Christmas presents. Remember to feed these, often rich foods, in moderation as part of their balanced diet to avoid tummy upsets and weight gain.

To keep your dog safe this festive season, Vet Sarah Aldridge urges you use the advice above and download our Pet Proofing guide for your home. Contact Daventry Vets on 01327 877767 if you are at all concerned about your dog – we wish you a Merry Christmas!

Pet Proof Your Home This Christmas

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